Can an Auto Insurance company force you to use aftermarket parts for repair in Connecticut?

Can an Auto Insurance company force you to use aftermarket parts for repair in Connecticut?

I had tire tread fly into my car on the highway. Tore the bumper and smashed the condenser. The insurance company has after market parts on the estimate, but I want to sell this car someday and want OEM. I'-m pretty sure I am out of luck, but just wanted to make sure as this is my first time dealing with an incident. Thanks.

doanenut

No they can't. I have been told so numerous times by estimators. Insist on new and also OEM parts.

oklatom

http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/jan2000/m… discusses just this situation.Bottom line seems to be junk yard parts, no. After market and OEM are often the same part made by the same company with a different sticker and two prices. In most states they can use after market but have to notify the customer of such. It really makes little difference, and if you stop and think about it, if OEM was mandated and required, insurance rates would skyrocket as a result.

MSAD

The first thing to look at is what parts are after market and OEM.Most companies will use after market radiator's and condensers and bumper covers. Using these parts after market will have no affect on the car's value.Also - it sounds like you are making a claim against your policy. You policy has language in it that allows the insurance company to use after market and used parts.If you want and OEM bumper cover and condenser - you will have to pay the parts price difference out of pocket.Source(s):Insurance Adjuster

Uwish

They cannot force you, however, that is all they are obligated to pay for. If you want OEM you would have to pay the difference in price from OEM and aftermarket.Your vehicle is only entitled to OEM from the insurance company if it is the current yr make and model w/ less than 12K Miles.Sorry but I hope this helpsSource(s):Claims adjuster 5 yrs.

jrhd97

It depends on your policy.http://www.ct.gov/cid/site/default.asp Go here and ask them. They have people who can answer this better. They make the rules regarding insurance in your state.

christopher

When you go to sell the car they wont' care about the OEM parts. If you go to a dealer to trade the car in, they will see work is done. Right there they will assume the worst. You can fight yoru insurance company. Get an estimate on your own and see if they will pay for it or meet you half way.

Jifr

Hiya:Just a couple of things to keep you in the know.....It's YOUR car. Not the insurance company's car. YOU can put whatever you want on YOUR car.Pretty simple, eh.Now...about the insurance:What you are owed = what you had.If you had a 1987 bumper with paint scratches and bird poop on it before the accident? That's what they owe you.Chances are though - they're not gonna find it.Now - people freak out about 'aftermarket' parts but....I HONESTLY don't think people know what that means.Have you ever put a battery in your car? That's aftermarket. Have you ever put new tires on your car? That's aftermarket. Have you ever put a stereo in your car? That's aftermarket.Ever had a windshield crack that was fixed or replaced? Aftermarket.Getting the picture here? There's nothing wrong with aftermarket.States ALLOW insurance companies to use CAPA certified aftermarket parts. Bumpers? Yep. Condensors? Yep.SHEET METAL is where the aftermarket contention starts.If they are not putting sheet metal on your car....do YOU know anyone who is going to pull a bumper or condensor off of a car to look and see if it has an OEM stamp on it? I don't....I know HOW to do it and I wouldn't even do it.A bumper....is a bumper. It's not an engine.Now - if you're still gun-ho to get yourself some OEM parts - since the insurance company only owes you what you HAD - they can get a quote for a USED OEM bumper off of the same model car you have that's sitting in a salvage (junk) yard. THAT's OEM for ya.Soooo...do you want NEW....or do you want old, used and abused?Of course, your other option is to take the money the insurance company owes you....go to the dealer...tell them you want OEM.....and pay the difference. It's your car...you can get whatever you want.All of this is moot if you have a 2007-2008 model vehicle with less than....let's say.....12K miles on it.Hope that all makes sense and hope all turns out well for ya.~jifr!Source(s):Insurance professional 10+ years

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